Parables of Earth – Part IV

The Farmer knows He must prepare the earth,
and He understands that this process is
an ongoing practice. The land is worth
only as much as the labour of His

hands. He must remain vigilant for weeds,
as these can quickly overtake a field.
These unwanted plants can choke out His seeds
and very quickly will destroy His yield.

And every spring, He must gather each stone
that winter’s frost has pushed up from below.
Though the labour is hard,He does not groan,
for His reward is seeing His crops grow

An abundant harvest will not be found
If rocks or thorns are left upon the ground

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An open letter to a management company that I have the misfortune of having to deal with

To say your work is second rate
Would give more credit than you’re due
I won’t say that you’re dumb as rocks
‘Cuz rocks are brighter far than you

You claim that you can do your job
You even say you know your stuff
No evidence though have you shown
I have to say”enough’s enough!”

This latest stunt, though, takes the cake
You said to us you’d booked a trade
The plumber, though, had not been called
How long will you keep this charade?

You take the word “incompetence”
To levels never seen before
Each time I think I’ve seen your worst
You find a way to make worst more.

Parables of Earth – Part III

Soil quality will affect the yield
that a farmer can expect from his land.
for untamed land to be turned into field,
he will have to do much hard work by hand
such as clearing rocks and trees, or burning
brambles and weeds before he will ever
plant any seeds. The process of turning
land from rugged to fruitful is never
easy. Likewise hard work is needed to
make a wise adult out of a child.
Discipline and counsel are needed through
childhood or the youth may remain wild

To give his future crops the greatest worth
The Farmer knows He must prepare the earth.

Parables of Earth -Part II

Hard packed, sun -baked dirt is of little worth
and so The Farmer uses blade to break
the ground before seeding. This way the earth
is made more receptive. He’ll also take

fertilizer and spread it on his land.
This process adds nutrients that his crop
will need. Does the soil ever demand
that the tilling and fertilizing stop?

If you have faced trials or trouble in
life, you are blessed! For these can be the hoe
and fertilizer that help you begin
to be soil in which good crops will grow

The Farmer understands that on his field,
soil quality will affect the yield.

~~

To read all parts of this sonnet cycle (as far as completed), hover over “The Elemenent – Sonnet Cycles” at the top of the page and select “Earth”.

~~

Sharing this at dVerse for Open Link Night

Parables of Earth – Part I

Before he plants, the Farmer tills his field.
This is one of many steps that must be
taken if he hopes for his land to yield
a good harvest. Imagine, though, that he

chose to delay the tilling and instead
lived each day for merriment. If pleasure
became his greatest aim: if meat and bread
were laid out for all his friends like treasure,

Then for a time laughter and song would fill
his house! But then when the leaves began to
turn colour, he would be faced with the chill
realization, “there’ll be no crop for you!”

Farmland that yields no crops will bring no mirth
Hard packed sun-baked dirt is of little worth

~~

This is the first part of what will eventually become a fifteen part sonnet cycle on the theme of “earth”. Click on “The Elements – Sonnet Cycles” tab up above I’d you would like to see either of my completed cycles on water and fire.

Linking to dVerse on Jun.27 for Open Link Night

Storm

The sky was brass that year in spring, there was no rain in sight
Old Sol burned fiercely in the day, cool did not come at night
The townsfolk spoke without much hope, for there was little doubt
That with the land so parched and dry, this year would be a drought

The farmers planted, knowing that they sowed their seeds in vain
Unless things changed and changed real soon, the fields would grow no grain
Town Council rationed water, for they had to draw the line
If anybody had green grass, they’d have to pay a fine

Then fin’ly in July the clouds came, white and tow’ring high
And at the top they flattened, making anvils in the sky
The children laughed “now we’ll have rain! We know that it can’t fail”
But those who had more years said, “go inside, we’re in for hail”

The kids were right: the rains came down in buckets and in sheets
and chunks of ice like baseballs fell on houses and on streets
This rain was not the kind that folks had wanted on their ground
For though the rains had fin’ly come, now all the land was drowned.

~~

Written for dVerse, where quatrains are being explored.  I have written a poem in the style of a “fourteener”.  Each quatrains follows an AABB rhyme scheme.