Psalm Sunday – Psalm 2

My response to Psalm 2 is a slightly modified villanelle form

~~

Rise up oh nations. Rage and march to war
Rebel against the Most High if you dare!
Wage your battles before you are no more

What is it about goodness you abhor
That you plot violence in your hidden lair…
Why nations, do you rage and march to war?

Your plans are foolish – facts that you ignore
Your force is weaker than you are aware
(So) wage your battles before you are no more

God’s laughter shakes the world down to its core
His wrath is kindled, peoples, so beware
Oh nations, must you rage and march to war?

Like a clay pot that’s thrown to the floor
Will be your army: shattered earthenware
Wage your battles before you are no more

Turn to the one the whole earth should adore
Lest God, to you in anger should declare:
“Rise up, oh nations. Rise and march to war.
Wage your battles. Soon you will be no more.”

Beware of writing poetry about ploughs!

Some words appear to rhyme upon first sight
And usually this rule works quite well, although
I warn you that this isn’t always right

These “sight rhymed” words can cause the poet plight
If they are writing poems about a plough
‘Cause some words seem to rhyme upon first sight

If farmers use their plough too late at night
They run the risk of ending in the slough
And I can tell you now, that isn’t right!

And if they’re ploughing when it is quite bright
Some farmers find the sunlight makes them cough
And all ’cause some words seem to rhyme on sight!

Do “sight rhymed” words cause you to want to fight?
I understand that urge can be quite rough
Although I do not think that this is right!

So if you’re writing poetry, you might
Find that these words can cause quite the hiccough
‘Cause Some words seem to rhyme upon first sight
But you will find this isn’t always right!

~~

at dVerse, we are writing villanelles. I couldn’t resist the urge to bend the rules to the breaking point, and yes, I took a LOT of liberties with the refrain lines.