How Not To Write A Sonnet In the Style of William Shakespeare

it is true that most sonnets possess
an iambic pentameter beat
yet I don’t think my poetry less
and in fact it may be quite a treat

and so here I submit unto you
anapestic trimetrical verse
is it better? Quite doubtful ’tis true
yet it certainly could be much worse

to have fun with a poem is my goal
and I like to bend rules (just a bit)
so my words I’ll continue to dole
and just hope you will not mind my wit

if like Shakespeare you’re hoping to be
when you write sonnets, don’t copy me!

~~

at dVerse, Tony Maude is having us write sonnets.  I actually quite enjoy the form, but often like breaking (or tweaking) the rules.  Hope you don’t mind too much!

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22 thoughts on “How Not To Write A Sonnet In the Style of William Shakespeare

  1. Laughing out loud 😀

    And, at least according to Don Paterson, sonnets don’t have to be pentametric, iambic or even to rhyme. Check out his book of 101 Sonnets if you don’t believe me.

    • Thanks Tony! If you are laughing out loud, I have done my job 🙂 Yes, sonnets certainly can come in a multitude of forms…it’s nice that one can still be flexible within a given form!

  2. smiles… having fun with a poem is one of my goals as well… and i too don’t mind, bending the rules a bit… a clever write bryan…

  3. ha. i am glad you had fun with it….that is about the best i can muster when it comes to form…have a bit of fun and hit near the mark…but never quite there….ha…..break those rules…and form indeed…

  4. Really dug your cleverness & audacity; I jumped on the rhyme too, and just flopped the feet around for several meters. I, too, found that fun was more appropriate than perfect iambic form. Nice job; smiles.

  5. Funny and charming! I have only been by a couple of times, but each time was a treat. I drop in more often.

  6. Ha ha…still you held to the form you chose to write and I’m not sure I could have managed that without quite a bit of thought and work! Very clever and funny…loved that inverted couplet..made me giggle.

  7. I find it interesting you chose anepest over iambic…definitely a twist. Shakespearean-like or not…I’m quite impressed.

  8. Clever indeed. I miss some images, but you made up for that by invoking Shakespeare–and I used very few images myself, actually.

  9. You know how people say ‘I wish I’d written this’? Well, I SO wish I would have written this! I have so many memories of struggling with meter and form back in the day! Of raving against what I considered ‘high-brow’ and ‘elitist’ poetry speak (things like sestinas and – one of my all time favourites – iambic pentameter)! You made me smile with this, but even as I did I found myself counting syllables and checking rhymes (times have changed, apparently). It is a beautiful write! Really!

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