Days of the Week

For those of you who have ever wondered how the days of the week got their names, you could probably find out the truth from web-sites such as Wikipedia.  However, I would like to give you my Alternate Take on the origin of the names:

Monday – a cultural day that celebrates the way Jamaican’s greet each other.  Hey mon!  It’s Mon Day!

Tuesday – or Two’s Day – the only day of the week named for a number.  The number 2 was probably chosen because Tuesday is the second day of the work-week for most people.

Wednesday – or When’s Day – the only day of the week named for the 5 W’s.  Since a day is a period of time, it is not a who, what, where or why – it is a when.  Hence “when” was the chosen W for Wednesday

Thursday – originally Thirst Day – the first of two days set aside to celebrate appetite – in the case of Thursday, beverages are the item of celebration.

Friday – or Fry Day – the second of two days set aside to celebrate appetite – Contrary to popular belief, Friday does not merely celebrate French Fries (although the folks at McDonald’s would probably like you to think so), but the day celebrates all foods fried – whether on a skillet or in a deep-fryer.  The name was nearly Greezday (Grease Day), but it was thought that too many people would mistake the day for automotive grease or the country of Greece.

Saturday – or Sitter’s Day – named for the fact that, as the first day of the weekend, people could enjoy sitting around and watching TV.

Sunday – the only day of the week that was not named after anything at all.

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